• Supporting Reserve Forces and Cadets in the South East

    Reserves & Cadets
  1. Gliding Dreams Comes Closer for Shoreham Air Cadets

    Despite last weekend’s chilly weather three cadets from 1440 (Shoreham-by-Sea) Squadron came a step closer to realising their dreams of gliding when they spent the day at the former Battle of Britain airfield at RAF Kenley in Surrey. Corporal Michael Gray (14), Corporal R...

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    Gliding Dreams Comes Closer for Shoreham Air Cadets

    Gliding Dreams Comes Closer for Shoreham Air Cadets

    Despite last weekend’s chilly weather three cadets from 1440 (Shoreham-by-Sea) Squadron came a step closer to realising their dreams of gliding when they spent the day at the former Battle of Britain airfield at RAF Kenley in Surrey. Corporal Michael Gray (14), Corporal Rosie Dyett (13) and Cadet Joseph Ramet (15) travelled to Kenley, the home of 615 Volunteer Gliding Squadron, to become the latest in a long line of Air Cadets to pass through their doors to begin their gliding experience.

    Gliding is one of the RAF Air Cadets core activities and the team were at Kenley to beginning their training to earn their “wings.” The three spent time in the hanger with qualified gliding instructors, looking over the two-seat Grob Viking T1 glider that has been used to fly cadets for many years. They learnt about how the aircraft gets into the sky and more importantly what keeps them there without engines! They also learnt how an operational gliding airfield works and how they fit in to the bigger picture.

     

    The cadets were all itching to get into the air but, as with all things, they needed to start at the beginning which for them this meant time firmly on the ground! The cadets were able to take control of the Viking simulator together with one of the instructor team where they were able to put into practice some of the theory they had learnt earlier in the day. Rosie, from Shoreham, said: “When it was my turn to go into the simulator, I was a bit nervous to start with but my instructor was really good and it was great fun!” Joseph added: “We learn about the principles of flight at the Squadron, but it has been great to be able to actually see how it all works and experience it for myself. I can’t wait to get into the air for real!”

     

    Sergeant Leslie Ackerman, an adult volunteer at 1440 Squadron said: “By starting the cadets off using a simulator on the ground, they are able to understand the basics of how aircraft fly and what the controls do to affect that. This makes for a much better experience when they do take to the skies.”

     

    Passing the Ground School element of their gliding training means that the team can now progress, take to the air and put into practice some of the things they learnt in the coming months.   

     

    Do you think you’ve got what it takes to be an Air Cadet, Adult Volunteer or member of our Support Committee? 1440 Squadron are keen to recruit young people aged between 12 (and in Year 8 at school) to 18 as well as adults who are keen to help us deliver the best opportunities to our cadets. Interested? Drop us an e-mail at 1440@aircadets.org or visit our website www.1440sqn.org.

  2. 142 (QOOH) VEH SQN – BATTLEFIELD STUDY

    As we have just reached the end of the year in which commemorations to mark the Centenary of the Great War came to an end, I wanted to write up the amazing experience that some soldiers and ex serving members of 142 (QOOH) Vehicle Squadron got to experience in November 2018.

    (Sgt Steve Renwick, LCpl Nick Thompson, Cpl Jon Melling, Cpl Graham Martin, SSgt Tom Robertson & SSgt Mark Taylor)

    The history of the Queens Own Oxfordshire Hussars (QOOH) is something that is held highly within our squadron given that we still hold the honorary title of QOOH, so I would like to reflect on...

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    142 (QOOH) VEH SQN – BATTLEFIELD STUDY

    142 (QOOH) VEH SQN – BATTLEFIELD STUDY

    As we have just reached the end of the year in which commemorations to mark the Centenary of the Great War came to an end, I wanted to write up the amazing experience that some soldiers and ex serving members of 142 (QOOH) Vehicle Squadron got to experience in November 2018.

    (Sgt Steve Renwick, LCpl Nick Thompson, Cpl Jon Melling, Cpl Graham Martin, SSgt Tom Robertson & SSgt Mark Taylor)

    The history of the Queens Own Oxfordshire Hussars (QOOH) is something that is held highly within our squadron given that we still hold the honorary title of QOOH, so I would like to reflect on the personal impact that a visit to the battlefields of WW1 had on individuals both young and old who attended.

    We started the tour at the ARC in Banbury where 30 of us headed off towards via Maubeuge, France via the Euro Tunnel. Maubeuge is a town of approx. 30,000 people in northern France, situated on the banks of the Sambrea a stone’s throw from the Belgium border to the North. The evening of arrival on the 7th of November is ours and many take the opportunity to sample a few of the local bistros, bars and fortifications that surround the city.

    An early start on day 2 sees us head up head to Rifle Wood, where the QOOH had seen action on the 1st April 1918 (Two days after the battle for Moreuil Wood fought by the Canadians), this was a decisive part of the war for the QOOH, known as ‘The Last Great Cavalry Charge’, for obvious reasons.  There is a memorial not far from Rifle Wood on the southeast side, erected by the Canadians in 2004 to remember their men who died at Moreuil and Rifle Woods, and which includes a plaque commemorating the QOOH men who fought at Rifle Wood. Serving Members of the squadron laid a wreath in memorial. Following this we headed to the joint Canadian/UK memorial for a tour of the site and to look at the immense size and scale of what was in place.

    On day 3 saw we visited the Flesquières museum. An amazing experience and highly recommended if you can go, which comes with an amazing story of how the tank was found. For six years a man searched, dug, read archive reports, war reports and files to find the tank that was supposedly buried in area after succumbing to German fire. Eventually after years of searching he found it buried 2 metres down and they dug out a Mark IV Deborah tank, buried whole. The tank is now on display at this purpose built museum for everyone to see, and it is truly amazing to look at.

    From the museum we visited the Flesquiéres Hill Commonwealth War Cemetery, here we spent some time to reflect on the ages of some of the soldiers and officers who had fought within the area. From Flesquiéres we headed back to the hotel to prepare for a tour and meal in the Angelus brewery, Erquelinnes. A very interesting evening unfolded which ended rather late….

    On the fourth day we headed to visit the American Memorial and Graveyard at Bony, a staggering 14.3 acre cemetery containing the graves of 1,844 of military dead. From Bony we drove to Guillemont Farm. Guillemont Farm is something that all members of the QOOH have at least minimal knowledge of due to its importance. It was here that Major Valentine Fleming (father of Ian Fleming) and two other officers were killed in 1917 along with many QOOH soldiers. It was very rainy and windy when we visited the farm, and it only added to the feeling that this would not have been a very nice place to have been whilst under constant German offensive.

    We got back in the minibuses and headed to Templeux-Le-Guérard Commonwealth War Grave Cemetery.  Here we left crosses at the graves of QOOH soldiers who died in the area. Old, Macey, White, Bleloch, Cox, Saunders, Buckle, Podbery, Baylis, Lovejoy, Buswell, Ayris, Thompson, Silvertop and course Fleming.

    That evening we were invited to the 2018 Armistice Gala Concert in Erquelinnes, the focus of our battlefield study. The evening was a grand event of music, dancing, local beer and food which went on well into the night. It was a great evening and the town Major of Erquelinnes made us feel very welcome.

    The final day, the most important. The Centenary of the Great War coming to an end. I had the great honour of riding a somewhat reluctant horse through the town of Erquelinnes. It was here on the final day of the war that the men of the QOOH rode in on horseback to liberate the town.

    There is a photograph of a QOOH Soldier on horseback with the backdrop of a local shop behind him which was replicated to mark the occasion before we marched front and centre of the procession to the Erquelinnes Communal Cemetery, paying homage to the fallen and laying a wreath for all soldiers who had fought and died in WW1.

    (Military members of the Battlefield Study)

    The day ended with an Armistice ceremony in the town square, where both speeches and gifts were exchanged between the QOOH Association and both the Town Major of Banbury (who sent a gift over with us) and Erquelinnes. After a beautiful silence, we were lead from the square, carrying the local beer and wine provided to a massive banquet in the town hall to celebrate the centenary of the Armistice.

    The Battlefield study was amazing and insightful, I really enjoyed it, following the history of our squadron through the final months of WW1 was invaluable and now when we parade with our colours through Banbury I can really understand the battle honours bestowed onto it. I think all who went on the study can thank those who organised it and indeed 165 Port and Maritime Regiment for allowing 142 Squadron to conduct this Battlefield study alongside the Regimental run one that happens each year.

    I’d say to anyone who hasn’t been on a Battlefield study to get on the next available one, seeing what happened during WW1 puts most things into perspective.

    Cpl Martin

    142 (QOOH) Vehicle SQN

  3. A Company 3 PWRR - Sgt Bell awarded medals for his service

    Sergeant (Sgt) Michael Bell currently serving with local Army Reserve unit, the 3rd Battalion, The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, known as the TIGERS has been awarded two medals for his operational service.   

    Sgt Bell, 32 from North London a...

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    A Company 3 PWRR - Sgt Bell awarded medals for his service

    A Company 3 PWRR - Sgt Bell awarded medals for his service

    Sergeant (Sgt) Michael Bell currently serving with local Army Reserve unit, the 3rd Battalion, The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, known as the TIGERS has been awarded two medals for his operational service.   

    Sgt Bell, 32 from North London and is a member of the 2nd Battalion, The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment (PWRR); however is posted into the local reserve unit as a Permanent Staff Instructor (PSI). He is based with A Company 3 PWRR at Manston, Ramsgate but also covers military duties at the platoon outstation in Ashford.

    Sgt Bell has served with the Regular Army since leaving school and follows in his older brother’s footsteps. He has seen operational experience in Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq as well as deploying overseas several times on exercise.

    “Since joining I have really enjoyed every opportunity of my time with the Army.  It has taught me a lot about myself and given me a unparalleled level of life experience.  I have had the opportunity to travel and learn about different countries and the culture of the people there.”

    Sgt Bell has been presented with a further two medals.  These are in recognition of his time spent in Iraq serving on Operation SHADER.  This is a training mission where the British Army is deployed to assist with the training of the Iraqi Army.  Sgt Bell spent six months in the country as part of the training team; there he taught the Iraqi soldiers both basic skills as well as some more specialised skills.  Some of this reflected the high level of training that he himself received from the British Army and they benefitted from the experiences that he has also had from his past tours of duty.

    The second award was in recognition of his accumulated service.  The Accumulated Service Medal is award to individuals who have completed more than 720 days on operational service.  Sgt Bell achieved this during his time away on Op SHADER.

    “Since being in my new post as PSI in a reserve Battalion, I have been given the opportunity to pass on my knowledge and wisdom to the future soldiers and leaders of the 3rd Battalion. In some respects, this is like my time on Op SHADER.  I hope this will stand them in good stead for future operations on which they might deploy; which is still an important task for the Army Reserve.”

    Sgt Bell has about another year in his post with 3 PWRR before he will return to 2 PWRR his parent unit.  2 PWRR has recently re-roled into one of the new Special Infantry Battalions of the British Army.  These help to deal with the various training missions that are currently being undertaking across the world.  He will no doubt be able to take with him plenty of instructional experience from his time spent with the Army Reserve.

     

  4. A Company 3PWRR - Assist less fortunate local people this Christmas

    The Community Engagement Team from the 3rd Battalion, The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, also known as the TIGERS have been busy over this festive period. After another successfully Battalion Christmas Carol Service; held at Canterbur...

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    A Company 3PWRR - Assist less fortunate local people this Christmas

    A Company 3PWRR - Assist less fortunate local people this Christmas

    The Community Engagement Team from the 3rd Battalion, The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, also known as the TIGERS have been busy over this festive period. After another successfully Battalion Christmas Carol Service; held at Canterbury Cathedral they have switched their attention to those less fortunate.

    Colour Sergeant Paul Harris, 52 from Canterbury has been a member of the Army Reserve for 35 years. Based at the Headquarters at Sturry Road in Canterbury, he has been busy canvassing local businesses to help sponsor his initiative to help both the local OAP’s and the children’s ward at Canterbury and Ashford hospitals.

    “My whole idea was in some way to say thank you for everyone’s support and service throughout the year. Every year we receive a donation from the members of these community centres and I wanted to show our appreciation and try and give something back. Not everyone is as blessed as I am with a large family at this time of year so remembering the lonely and those who are more vulnerable is especially important. I would also like to thank all the business's that donated to this; without them it really wouldn’t have happened.”

    Over the last week, he has delivered food hampers to the Herne Bay and Northgate Community Centres. He has also put together children’s packages full of colouring books, colouring pens, pencils and other activities to help keep the youngsters occupied plus a thank you hamper for the hardworking nurses on the children’s wards in Canterbury and Ashford hospitals. These have been distributed by local soldiers and officers based in the two locations.

    Maj James Titchener, Officer Commanding, A Company 3 PWRR based at Rowcroft Barracks in Ashford said: “There has been excellent work performed by Colour Harris as the Second in Command of the Community Engagement Team. He has really put himself out there to gather all the different elements to make up both the hampers and the children’s packages. It’s a wonderful idea of his and certainly allows my soldiers and I to conduct a really worthwhile visit; and hopefully bring a bit of festive cheer to the children and the nurses.”

    The 3rd Battalion is the local Army Reserve Infantry unit based across the South East of England. They are always looking to welcome new recruits; so, if you are looking for an exciting, varied and paid spare-time occupation go and see them. Open evenings every last Wednesday of each month.

     

     

  5. Hampshire and Isle of Wight RAFAC WW1 Visit to Ypres and Passendale

    On Friday 25th Oct 2018, 77 staff and cadets from Hampshire and ...

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    Hampshire and Isle of Wight RAFAC WW1 Visit to Ypres and Passendale

    Hampshire and Isle of Wight RAFAC WW1 Visit to Ypres and Passendale

    On Friday 25th Oct 2018, 77 staff and cadets from Hampshire and Isle Of Wight Wing Royal Air Force Air Cadets commenced a two day visit to Ypres and Passendale. During the course of the trip the cadets visited a number of different WW1 locations,  Essex Farm Cemetery (where Lt Col John McCrae wrote his poem “ In Flanders Field”), the German Cemetery at Langemark, the British Cemetery at Poelkapelle, where at the grave of Private John Condon aged 14 (at time of death), four cadets of similar age to him laid a wreath. Visits were also made to Tyne Cot Cemetery, Flanders Field and the Passendale Museums. However the highlight of the trip was taking part in the Last Post Parade at the Menin Gates where Sqn Ldr Brian Swan Deputy OC Hants & IOW Wg laid a wreath on behalf of all staff and cadets from Hants & IOW Wing.  

     

  6. 606 (Beaconsfield) Squadron Air Cadets- Squadrons Soldier Project

    Cadets from  606 Air Cadets in Beaconsfield have been helping Oxford University “Lest We Forget” Project which is aiming to digitalise memorabilia from WWI before it is lost. As such they ar...

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    606 (Beaconsfield) Squadron Air Cadets- Squadrons Soldier Project

    606 (Beaconsfield) Squadron Air Cadets- Squadrons Soldier Project

    Cadets from  606 Air Cadets in Beaconsfield have been helping Oxford University “Lest We Forget” Project which is aiming to digitalise memorabilia from WWI before it is lost. As such they are part of the Beaconsfield WWI Commenaration Group, it has been decided that the items we had recorded would go on display. The main issues whilst we were originally planning was that we had more stories than items and we weren’t sure how to bring them to life.

    At the same meeting the church raised they had been donated 15 There but There Soldiers instead of 5. I asked if we could use them to display the stories. We were then given 10 to create a temporary display with.

    We gave one to each flight on the Squadron, then groups of cadets/individuals took the other ones to design. We also have one to the local Volunteer Police Cadets to design.

    They spent a few weeks researching, putting on sticky back plastic as they were going to be temporary. Then numerous decorating, building, creating them. They also had to provide a write up on what inspired them.

    They went on display at the Town Hall for two days, and then we got a request if they could be used for the Veterans Lunch on Rememberance Day.

    Then we received an email stating that it had been decided that it would be a shame to take the designs off them, therefore they had been donated back to the Squadron. However we’ve received an additional email from the Town Council today saying that they have received so many requests about the exhibition they are looking at ways to put it back on.

    https://drive.google.com/drive/mobile/folders/1srj_ASk619UrCQxECpDSTITGeXvTGsVK?usp=sharing_eip&ts=5be9ec37

  7. 151 Regiment Royal Logistic Corps Participation in the Lord Mayor Show 2018

    151 Regiment RLC will be participating in the Lord Mayor Show on Saturday 10th November 2018. This year’s display is inspired by the RLC’s 25th birthday message. ‘Centuries old, Decades new&rsquo...

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    151 Regiment Royal Logistic Corps Participation in the Lord Mayor Show 2018

    151 Regiment Royal Logistic Corps Participation in the Lord Mayor Show 2018

    151 Regiment RLC will be participating in the Lord Mayor Show on Saturday 10th November 2018. This year’s display is inspired by the RLC’s 25th birthday message. ‘Centuries old, Decades new’. We have a fantastic history going back centuries. The achievements of the Corps since forming in 1993 are exceptional and worth celebrating to inspire those who will serve through the next 25 years. The unit will be position number 77 in the parade. The RLC contribution sequence is a Tank Transporter, a Rolls Royce and Bedford Fuel Tanker.

    The Tank Transporter- the RLC’s Heavy Equipment Transporters, crewed by two specialist drivers from 27 Regiment RLC, weighing almost 47 tonnes un-laden. Capable of carrying all of the Army’s tanks and armoured vehicles. When fully Laden they can weigh nearly 120 tonnes.

    Representing our historic roots will be:-

    Monty’s Rolls Royce-  - Built for a long-untraceable woman in 1939, this Rolls Royce Wraith was commandeered by the Ministry of War-Transport on 24th January 1944. It’s a 1½ ton Park Ward bodied light Limousine, with a 4275cc engine, with light tan leather seats and hand moulded wooden trim. In 1944, Field Marshall Montgomery (the most important solider in the British Army and one of the key members of the planning the Allied invasion of Europe), left behind the Humber staff car he had in North Africa and settled for this Rolls Royce for something grander and more impressive.

    A Vintage Bedford Fuel Tanker- The tanker from 1952 supported operations in Northern Ireland in the 1960’s, shows a small cross-section of the huge variety of ‘stuff’ the Army needs in order to operate.  From tanks and ammunition to letters and food, we get the right amount of the right kit to the right people in the right place at the right time- which enables the Army to do its job, whilst boosting morale in the process. We fight logistics through to keep the Army operating, mobile and in communication.

    151 Regiment, RLC is London’s only logistic unit. Based out of 5 Army Reserve Centres (ARC) across Greater London and South East of England. Its deployable role is sustaining ‘The Iron Division’ – 3rd (UK) Division, the British Army’s high-readiness armoured war fighting formation. 151 Regiment proudly traces its origins and affiliations within the City of London back to 1801 and the formation of the Royal Wagon Train in Croydon.

  8. Cadet Armistice 2018

    On Wednesday 24th October 2018 a group of 81 Oxfordshire ACF cadets and CFAV had a fantastic opportunity to take part in a national cadet commemoration of the end of WW1. The day entailed...

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    Cadet Armistice 2018

    Cadet Armistice 2018

    On Wednesday 24th October 2018 a group of 81 Oxfordshire ACF cadets and CFAV had a fantastic opportunity to take part in a national cadet commemoration of the end of WW1. The day entailed an early start, 04.00am, was fast paced and packed full of emotion and experience.

    We had the privilege to visit and pay respects to a few of the fallen, hear about the conflict and walk in their footsteps. A number of cadets and adults were seen in deep thought at headstones bearing no cap badge and only the words ‘A Soldier of the Great War’.

    Our guides touched on the human stories of the conflict and one of our own CFAV shared a moving story from her own family.

    A poignant letter sent to a young soldier who joined aged 14 but fell age 16 was read out. He never had the opportunity to read the letter.

    At Theipval we joined other cadets from across the UK to pay our respects to 72,000 men who died in the Somme sector before 20th March 1918 and have no known grave, the majority of whom died during the Somme offensive of 1916. A very moving sight.

    Remembrance is not only a time to reflect it is also a time to celebrate. Our lost loved ones will want to be remembered with joy and for our cadets to live their lives to the fullest as they, the fallen, were unable to. It was fantastic to see all embrace the opportunity to make new cadet friends, to laugh, dance and sing. Joy so infectious that adults of all ranks, including a Commandant, could not help but join in.

    Before departing back to Oxfordshire the cadets performed their own tribute with a song to the fallen. A joy to listen to and observe.

    Oxfordshire ACF you are a credit to the Army Cadet Force and your generation. Your family of 1914-18 will be proud of you.

    The sacrifice of your forebears was not wasted.

  9. Close Encounters of the Giraffe Kind for Cadets


    On Sunday 21st October, volunteers from T.S. Churchill Ashford Sea and Marine cadets enjoyed a close encounter with Port Lympne Hotel & Reserve&...

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    Close Encounters of the Giraffe Kind for Cadets

    Close Encounters of the Giraffe Kind for Cadets


    On Sunday 21st October, volunteers from T.S. Churchill Ashford Sea and Marine cadets enjoyed a close encounter with Port Lympne Hotel & Reserve’s giraffe herd, to thank them
    for their valuable leaf picking skills throughout the summer months.

    Carl Parker, Head of African Experience Section explained: ‘The cadets have been
    absolutely brilliant and their incredible leaf picking skills this Summer mean that we now
    have over 30 barrels of leaves to feed the giraffes during the winter months.’
    The nine strong giraffe herd at the popular visitor attraction have a natural diet which
    consists mainly of browse, or leaves. During the summer months the reserve relies on
    volunteers to pick leaves which are then compressed in airtight barrels for use as a natural
    feed supplement during the winter months.

    As part of their day out at the popular visitor attraction, the cadets were able to enjoy a
    close encounter with the giraffes, including hand feeding some of the herd with pellets and
    browse.
    Simon Jeffery, Animal Director commented: ‘As a charity, we rely heavily on support from
    wonderful volunteers such as the cadets. By giving up their time to pack an impressive 30
    barrels of leaves it means that we can continue to provide our giraffes with important,
    natural feed.’
    For further information about Port Lympne Hotel & Reserve and volunteering
    opportunities, please visit www.aspinallfoundation.org/portlympne

  10. The Duke of York’s Royal Military School “Exercise Dukie Warrior 2018”

    This year as a Contingent, we planned and executed our own summer camp at Salisbury Plain Training Area (SPTA) Wiltshire. We took 90 Cadets and 11 staff of enthusiastic adult volunteers drawn, in the main, from teachers within the School.

    We deployed the day a...

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    The Duke of York’s Royal Military School “Exercise Dukie Warrior 2018”

    The Duke of York’s Royal Military School “Exercise Dukie Warrior 2018”

    This year as a Contingent, we planned and executed our own summer camp at Salisbury Plain Training Area (SPTA) Wiltshire. We took 90 Cadets and 11 staff of enthusiastic adult volunteers drawn, in the main, from teachers within the School.

    We deployed the day after Grand Day to SPTA, a training area used by British Armed forces and forces from around the world. The training area has many challenging training facilities with Battle Camp accommodation.

    Challenge, adaptability and tenacity - there was time for self-reflection for the Dukie Cadets this year on Exercise Dukie Warrior ‘18. At SPTA we conducted build up training which felt seamless due to the year’s hard work and training preparation by the cadets and staff at the Schools unique training area and range. 
    Enthusiastic to hone their military skills further, the training programme for the cadets was full of new demanding and enjoyable challenges, culminating in a final confirmatory exercise set in an urban environment at Imber Village SPTA. We also had assistance from the 1st Battalion the Princesses Royal Regiment who brought with them two Warrior Armoured infantry fighting vehicles and a selection of Infantry platoon weapons. They instructed the Cadets in the role and effectiveness of a Warrior and platoon weapons.

    The training began with vehicle check point drills, section attacks, weapon handling, team building, battlefield first aid, Bulford Ranges and a competition day.

    The younger cadets were commanded by the Cadet JNCO and SNCO’S who the potential junior under officers were for 2018/19. They acted in an enthusiastic, strong-minded, confident professional manner with drive and determination, when put under pressure from their command appointments.

    “Young Dukie leaders emerge from the shadows of Imber village”

    The Potential Officers were given appointments to prove their leadership skills during the final exercise phase at Imber Village. This allowed the RSM and staff to select competent and confident Potential Officers to take up the role of under officer in September. This consisted of leading sections in a physically, mentally and demanding urban tactical environment.

    The final attack consisted of 2 platoons attacking and securing Imber. It was then that the ambush was set for the enemy who were re-grouping to attack and take back Imber from the Dukie’s. Imber was saved and the enemy forced to retreat.

    The Dukie cadets worked hard all week during the build-up, training and the final exercise phase. For their hard work and efforts they were rewarded with some RNR with a fun day at Thorpe Park.

  11. Battle of Britain Memorial Service

    Last Sunday, Cadets and Staff from around the county assembled at St Andrew’s Church, Tangmere for the Battle of Britain annual Service of Remembrance. Cadets gathered from all over...

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    Battle of Britain Memorial Service

    Battle of Britain Memorial Service

    Last Sunday, Cadets and Staff from around the county assembled at St Andrew’s Church, Tangmere for the Battle of Britain annual Service of Remembrance. Cadets gathered from all over the County to commemorate this event. The 40-strong squad marched from Tangmere Military Museum to St Andrew’s Church and were joined VIPs, including the High Sheriff of West Sussex - Mrs Caroline Nicholls DL. Cadets had the opportunity to remember those who fought in the Battle of Britain during World War Two and lay a wreath as a mark of respect.

    The Cadets were able to meet and enjoy some refreshments with the veterans and commemorate those who gave their lives during the Battle of Britain. Cadets also had the opportunity to explore the museum with the Veterans afterwards.

    The Battle of Britain was the German air force's attempt to gain air superiority over the RAF from July to September 1940. It inspired Winston Churchill’s famous quote "Never was so much owed by so many to so few"- a reference to the Pilots who fought in the battle, who are now known as ‘The Few’.

    Flying Officer Mark Sonsthagen, Officer Commanding of 461 (Chichester) Air Cadets, said:

    ‘These events serve to remind our communities that the younger generation, especially the Air Training Corps, are proud to represent the Royal Air Force in remembering the sacrifices others have made and continue to make to keep our Country safe. The Battle of Britain was a turning point in the Second World War and ‘we will remember them.’’

    Chichester Air Cadets is recruiting, if you are interested in joining and are aged 12-17, you can contact us on 461@aircadets.org for details of our next open evening. We also welcome applications for adult volunteers, who can contact us on the same address

  12. New joint cadet centre for the dover army cadet and royal air force air cadet units

    Army and Royal Air Force Air Cadets from Dover and the surrounding area joined Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant of Kent, Major The Viscount De L’Isle and the Chief Executive of South East Reserve Forces’ & Cadets’ Association, Colonel (Retired) Patrick Crowley, together with other local and military dignitaries at the official opening of their new Joint Cadet Centre at Dover, on Thursday 19 April 2018.

    The new Joint C...

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    New joint cadet centre for the dover army cadet and royal air force air cadet units

    New joint cadet centre for the dover army cadet and royal air force air cadet units

    Army and Royal Air Force Air Cadets from Dover and the surrounding area joined Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant of Kent, Major The Viscount De L’Isle and the Chief Executive of South East Reserve Forces’ & Cadets’ Association, Colonel (Retired) Patrick Crowley, together with other local and military dignitaries at the official opening of their new Joint Cadet Centre at Dover, on Thursday 19 April 2018.

    The new Joint Centre is now home to approximately 80 Cadets and also the B Company Headquarters of Kent Army Cadet Force and replaces the previous Army Cadet Force Detachment accommodation at the old Army Reserves Centre situated on this London Road, site, the Royal Air Force Air Cadets site in Albert Road and the Company Headquarters in Church Road, Shorncliffe, Folkestone. Both of the latter sites are being sold off for development, where none of the previous accommodation properly met the accommodation scales required for today’s Cadet Units. This new facility is based on the current MOD Cadet designs for these Centres and has resulted in the internal renovation of the existing Reserves Centre buildings and includes a large Drill Hall, classrooms, kitchenette, toilets, the existing indoor small bore target rifle range, and, administrative offices for the adult personnel and store rooms, where each of the three units have separate accommodation but with some sharing of the communal assets.

    Dover has had a long history associated with the Armed Forces and under the direction of the Army 2020 Basing Review, involving the move out of the area by the Reserves and the Army Recruiting Organisation, thereby vacating the Army Reserves Centre, the site has proved to be an ideal location to operate as a more permanent base for the local Army and Air Cadet Forces, which are military sponsored cadet organisations and for the Units concerned to be based at the same place, under the auspices of the South East Reserve Forces’ and Cadets’ Association. These projects benefit the taxpayer, by having a facility that is now in full use throughout the week, together with some weekends.

    South East Reserve Forces’ and Cadets’ Association and the Ministry of Defence (Army and Royal Air Force Air Cadet Headquarters) have worked closely together to develop this location for the Cadets and within a very short space of time, South East Reserve Forces’ and Cadets’ Association were able to secure suitable funding to enable this Dover site to be retained and be redeveloped into the Cadet accommodation required, sharing the costs between the Association and the Ministry of Defence, in order to re-house the Cadets.

    Commenting on the new building, Colonel Patrick Crowley, Chief Executive of the South East Reserve Forces’ and Cadets’ Association said, “We are delighted to be able to provide these Cadets and their Adult Instructors with a much needed new base with modern facilities. The new facility also allows us to maintain our strong military connections in the area whilst allowing the local youth community to enjoy the opportunities, challenges, skills and qualifications the Cadet Movement offers.”

    Both the Air Cadets and Army Cadets parade on a Tuesday and Thursday night from 1900-2100, we’re always looking for young people and adults to join us and take the opportunity to learn new skills, make new friends and earn qualifications in the process.

    Lieutenant Breeshea Robinson, Detachment Commander, Dover Army Cadet Force said:

    “We are very lucky at Dover to have such a great detachment building now run jointly with the Air Cadets - it’s a great opportunity for us to learn from each other. It feels like the building has a new lease of life! I’m very proud of my cadets and staff and we were honoured to have the Lord Lieutenant and other dignitaries in attendance”.

    WO Matt Dando, Officer in Charge, Dover Squadron said:

    “The opening of the joint cadet centre by the Lord Lieutenant marks the beginning of a new era for Dover Squadron. With better facilities it offers more opportunities for the cadets and allows for combined activities with Dover Detachment ACF”.

    For further information about joining Kent Army Cadet Force, contact (Tel No: 01622 750328 & Email: se-ken-ceo@rfca.org.uk), or, for the Kent Air Cadets, contact (Tel No: 01622 754188 & Email: oc.kent@aircadets.org). We particularly