• Supporting Reserve Forces and Cadets in the South East

    Reserves & Cadets
  1. 11 Infantry Brigade Cadet Leadership Course

    Introduction

    1.         Leadership Courses in  Folkestone over the period 19-26 October and 26 October- 2 November 2019. Cadets were selected from the Army Cadet Forces and Combined Cadet Forces of the 10 Regional Brigades. 90 young cadets aged from 15-17 years old attended the courses.

    Training Objectives

    The course training objectives were as follows.

                TO1     Promote Cadet Culture and Ethos.

              &a...

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    11 Infantry Brigade Cadet Leadership Course

    11 Infantry Brigade Cadet Leadership Course

    Introduction

    1.         Leadership Courses in  Folkestone over the period 19-26 October and 26 October- 2 November 2019. Cadets were selected from the Army Cadet Forces and Combined Cadet Forces of the 10 Regional Brigades. 90 young cadets aged from 15-17 years old attended the courses.

    Training Objectives

    The course training objectives were as follows.

                TO1     Promote Cadet Culture and Ethos.

                TO2     Understand, Apply and Develop Cadet Leadership Skills.

                TO3     Understand and Apply Battle Procedure and the Orders Process.

                TO4     Command and Control a Cadet Section / Platoon.

                TO5     Administer a Cadet Section / Platoon.

    Leadership Course Contents

    The courses were very intensive and the young cadets are challanged in all aspects of the Army Cadet Leadership Code.  The courses concentrate on the the seven leadership behaviours, leadership styles, values and standards, coaching, goal setting  and the GROW Coaching Model.

    The contents of the Cadet Leadeship Course included Command Tasks, Leadership Lectures with External Speakers, Battle Field Tour Visit to YPRES and Menin Gates, Infantry Tactical Scenerios, Leadership Presenations by Cadets, Visit to The Battle of Britain Memorial and the Memerial Musuem Passchendaele 1917.

    Command Tasks

    On the first morning of each course the cadets particapted in a round robin of 10 Command Tasks. Each cadet had the opportunity to lead, plan and excute a task. Command Tasks are the ideal opportunity for the Cadets to bond together, communicate effectively in order to work efficiently as a team. This is an early opportunity for the Cadet Training Team to identify the weaknesses and strengths of all the cadets.

    External Leadership Speaker

    Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Todd MBE (Royal Gurkha Rifles) gave an emotional  and inspiring leadership brief to the young cadets. The leadership brief covered how the G200 Everest Expedition, the attempt to put the first serving Gurkha on the summit to mark the 200th year of Gurkha service to the Crown. This was during the massive earthquake in Nepal in April 2015.  The massive quake caused an avalanche on the mountain which killed 22 climbers. The team stayed to help and were instructmental in the evacuation of 116 climbers.  The team then returned in 2017 to succesful achieve the great quest of climbing Everest. 

    Battle Field Tour – YPRES and Menin Gates.

    The Battle Field Tour visit to YPRES concentrated on  4 x Victoria Cross winners during YPRES. The presentations were focussed on their particular Leadership Behaviors, Values and Standards in achieving such an honour. The  4 x Victoria Cross winners were

    a.         Capt Noel Godrey Chavasse VC and Bar, MC. 1/10th (Scottish Battalion the King’s (Liverpool Regiment).

    b.         2nd Lieutant Benjamin Handley Geary VC. Ist Battalion The East Surrey Regiment.

    c.         Lance Sergeant Tom Fletcher Mayson VC. The Kings Own (Royal Lancaster) Regiment.

    d.         Private Edward Dwyer VC, Ist Battalion East Surrey Regiment.

    During the Battle Field Tour to YPRES the cadets visited the the Memerial Musuem Passchendaele, and the Menin Gate. Cadet LCpl Macksey of Magdalen College laid a wreath on the grave of Capt Noel Godrey Chavasse VC and Bar, MC a former pupil of the college. The cadets delivered some excellent leadership presentations on their Battle Field Tour experience which looked specifically at the leadership qualities of the 4 Victoria Cross winners.

    The Cadet Leadership Course had the great honour for 3 cadets to lay a wreath at the Menin Gate Last Post Ceremony.  The cadets that laid the wreath were Cdt Sgt Wynne (St Albans School  CCF, 7 Brigade), Cdt Cpl Dong (Bangor Grammar School CCF, 38 Irish Brigade) and Cdt CSgt Cribb (Oxfordshire ACF, 11 Infantry Brigade).

    Infantry Tactics

    The Cadet Leadership Course conducted a 3 day training package of Infantry Tactics, including Section Attacks, Room Clearing, Paintballing Force on Force Fire and Movement, Urban Patrolling, Vechicle Check Points, Quick Reaction Force Drills and a TIBUA Assault. The cadets had the ideal training facilities of Cinque Ports Training Area, Hythe and Lydd Ranges to practice their leadership styles. The young cadets were put through their paces after a walk-talk through phase. For the majority of cadets this was a new training environment which levelled the playing field regarding their cadet leadership ability. All the cadets thoroughly enjoyed the experience.

    The Battle of Britain Memorial Park Visit

    The cadets had the privilege to visit The Battle of Britain Memorial Park at Capel Le Ferne atop the famous White Cliffs. The National Memorial to the Few, dedicated to the heroic and selfless deeds of the men who fought in the Battle of Britain, 10 July to 31 October 1940. There was time reflect on the sacrifices made, their leadership qualities and the interaction with the Scramble Experience.   The cadets also received a 30 minutes presentation and saw the statue of the lone pilot, the Memorial Wall, and a replica hurricane and spitfire.

    South East Reserve Force and Cadet Force Assocation

    A special thanks to Colonel (Retired) Peter Crowley,  South East Reserve Force and Cadet Force Assocation who donated £500 to the Cadet Leadership Courses. This allowed the cadets to visit the museums, the purchase of the wreath for the Menin Gate Last Post Ceromeny, awards and prizes for the cadets. This was much appreciated by the young cadets.

    Cadet RSM John Taylor (Portsmouth Grammar CCF) and Cadet CSjt Cribb (Oxfordshire ACF) were awarded the Best Cadet prizes The cadets on both courses developed their Leadership Behaviours, Values, Standards and Styles. It was with immense proud to see the positive development of the young cadets. The courses were thoroughly enjoyed by the cadets and instructors.  The Army and Combined Cadet Forces are organisations which we should be rightly proud of, the Cadet Force Adult Volunteers and Cadets are a testament of what is good about our youth Organisation.

  2. TS Royalist Tall Ship Adventures

    TS Royalist

    Tall Ship Adventures

    By Thomas Williams 2210 Squadron

     

    I arrived on a cold damp Friday afternoon.  I climbed aboard with my waterproof rucksack in one hand and my TG21 and 3822 in the other. 

     

    I was there ...

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    TS Royalist  Tall Ship Adventures

    TS Royalist Tall Ship Adventures

    TS Royalist

    Tall Ship Adventures

    By Thomas Williams 2210 Squadron

     

    I arrived on a cold damp Friday afternoon.  I climbed aboard with my waterproof rucksack in one hand and my TG21 and 3822 in the other. 

     

    I was there on my own and knew none of the staff or any of the other cadets on board.

     

    As I was shown to the sleeping quarters below deck to dump my stuff, I was beginning to wonder what had I let myself in for? A week on a Tall Ship, bobbing about in the Solent giving me jelly legs and not having any friends……..

     

    Hmmmm – what was I thinking when I signed up for this!?!  Those thoughts lasted about 5 minutes until I met Frankie.  We soon got chatting and he told me all about L98 shooting, which I’m really interested in – so definitely off to a good start! After settling in, I began speaking to a few of the others including Ashley and Megan. It turned out Megan was on the same squadron as another cadet I had met on my cadet skiing trip earlier in the year.

    The rest of the evening was all about learning about the ship, some safety things and what to do and how it worked.

     

    This picture is of me and another new friend called Tom, same name as me—obviously best name in the world.

    Tom was incredibly tall (something like 6’5”) and he could reach everything!

    Soon it was down to business.  So there we were….now sailors!

     

    On another day (I don’t remember which one, they all seem the same when you get to my age) we began climbing the rigging. I remember standing at the bottom looking up into the sky wondering how tall they were. Like me, Megan quite enjoyed climbing and so we talked about all of the cool stuff we had done.

    I remember we kept asking the staff if we could go all the way up to the top, which of course we eventually did.

     

    As we were standing at the bottom looking up excited to get up, the others behind us were talking about some really bad thing that happened when someone went up without being clipped in. (Megan had already gone up at this point).  So there I was at the bottom absolutely bricking myself when the staff says “next up please”. So I climbed up to the first platform still scared even though we had done that part before earlier on in the week. Then I stood at the bottom of the next ladder up I grabbed on to the metal wires to pull myself up and as I reached the next platform it began to shake so I froze thinking is this the end….

    There was only one way out of this, so I climbed to the top and it was actually quite fun!

     

    Let’s talk food—I like food, so I was slightly concerned that it wouldn’t be very good and that I might get hungry.

    However, it was actually quite good and one of my particular favourites was the steak and kidney pie with chips (oh and I got two portions because I was nice to the chef!)

    I also really enjoyed one of the lunches that was some kind of fish sandwich with BBQ sauce.

    So at least I wasn’t going to starve for the week as the food was good.

     

    The Drills were quite fun and I particularly enjoyed the Man Overboard Drill because I got to throw the dummy overboard.  I had the legs on my shoulder and my friend had the head and we lifted it up over the side and threw it as far as we could!

     

    After a long hard days work of drills and effort we also had some shore leave where we went to watch some fireworks and bought more unnecessary drinks and snacks!

     

    I would definitely recommend for anyone to try out this trip if you are given the opportunity!

     

    The End

     

     

  3. All Enquiries

    All and any enquiries requesting usage of any...

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    All Enquiries

    All Enquiries

    All and any enquiries requesting usage of any of our resources and or facilities need to be directed through either the local authority “Emergency Planning Teams” and or the following web address for their contact details they in turn will be directed through the relevant JMCs in our case 11 Brigade “Emergency Planning Team”.

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/local-resilience-forums-contact-details
  4. Exercise Frimley Glacier 2020

    Exercise Frimley Glacier 2020

     

    On the 22nd February 2020 a group of fourteen instructors and ADS from Frimley Park embarked on an adventure training exercise to Les 3 Valées in France. Some had skied before but for many this was their first time taking part in winter sports.

     

    The expedition was...

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    Exercise Frimley Glacier 2020

    Exercise Frimley Glacier 2020

    Exercise Frimley Glacier 2020

     

    On the 22nd February 2020 a group of fourteen instructors and ADS from Frimley Park embarked on an adventure training exercise to Les 3 Valées in France. Some had skied before but for many this was their first time taking part in winter sports.

     

    The expedition was split into two groups who would train separately for their respective week-long courses. The larger of the groups would be undertaking Ski Foundation level 1 and was comprised of people brand new to the sport or those who had skied before but many years ago. The second group would be undertaking SF2 having completed SF1 the previous year and had a much wider spread of experience amongst its members.

     

    The journey out to France went mostly unhindered with only a short delay on the transfer from Geneva airport due to half-term traffic. Once settled into their various apartments the team met up at the ski hire shop to collect their equipment for the week. Unfortunately, it seemed like most of the resort had the same idea! Aafter a short while and some minor chaos everyone had been successfully issued with all the kit they needed.

     

    As the SF2 group would be spending time touring and skiing off piste they required specialist skis, boots and avalanche rescue equipment. Even the experienced skiers among them were unfamiliar with a lot of this new kit and it became clear that there would be a lot to learn this week.

     

    After an early night and some well-earned rest it was time to hit the slopes. Whilst the SF2 group were warming up and finding their ski-legs again on red and black pistes the SF1 group were getting to grips with the basics. As skiing was every new to most of them it was essential to build a solid foundation of basic skills to aid development over the rest of the week.

     

    As the week progressed the SF2 cohort began tackling more and more difficult terrain and venturing off-piste. The bright sunshine and 15 degree temperatures at the start of the week soon gave way to snow storms and deep fresh powder which made for some of the most exciting skiing conditions of the exercise. Initially the team struggled to adapt to the new conditions but quickly learnt how to change their technique when away from the flat groomed runs and ski more dynamically to be able to tackle deep snow, bumps and varying terrain. 

     

    On the penultimate day on the mountain SF2 faced the challenge that they had all been anticipating. It was time to start their introduction to touring which would be a new experience for them all.

     

    The first step was learning how to prepare their equipment for going uphill. The bindings needed adjusting to allow the foot to raise at the heel and pivot at the toe in order to allow a walking motion while staying attached to the ski. Next came the fitting of the “skins”. So called due to originally being made of seal skin these adhesive layers attach to the bottom of the ski to provide friction in one direction. This allows the skis to slide easily over the snow in the forwards direction but grip in the other direction preventing the skier from simply sliding back down the hill.

     

    Once the kit was all set up it was time to embark on their first ever attempt and ski touring. In the spirit of true determination, they veered off the steady incline of the nicely groomed blue slope they started on to make their way up a much steeper black run which was covered in fresh powder up to the knees. Even with all the specialist equipment the slope proved too steep to walk up directly so a zig-zag route was required. Whilst the ascent was by far the most physically demanding part of the course the ski back down in deep almost untouched snow made it all worthwhile.

     

    Meanwhile as the SF1 group were gaining more and more confidence they began to venture further afield. Moving away from the beginner areas the began taking chair lifts higher up the mountain and were competently skiing blue runs by the end of the week.

     

    One thing was certain, whatever the weather, there was always time for a Chocolat Chaud!

  5. Army Cadet activity is to be suspended with immediate effect

    In line with recent Government direction on the Covid-19 pandemic, all Army Cadet activity is to be sus...

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    Army Cadet activity is to be suspended with immediate effect

    Army Cadet activity is to be suspended with immediate effect

    In line with recent Government direction on the Covid-19 pandemic, all Army Cadet activity is to be suspended with immediate effect.

    Any face-to-face Army Cadet activities (including either cadets or CFAVs, and CTT support to CCF contingents) are to be cancelled or postponed with effect immediately.  This encompasses all activity out to 30 April 20, including detachment evenings, residential weekends and camps, visits, sport, music, DofE and AT.  Schools who are conducting CCF training inside their normal weekly co-curricular programme where it involves school employed CFAVs delivering training to their own school cadets in their own location and where this has been risk assessed by the school as part of the schools ongoing delivery of its curriculum may continue delivering their cadet training. All training must be confined to the school real estate.

    Commandants are advised to suspend subscriptions.

    Planning for cadet activities during May - August should continue, and a decision will be taken in late April with regard future activity and further direction given when the ongoing situation is clear.

    Please direct any questions you may have through your command chain. 

    Further updates will be issued in due course.

  6. GUILDFORD CADETS RAISE OVER £7000 IN CHARITY ROW-ATHON

    GUILDFORD CADETS RAISE OVER £7000 IN

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    GUILDFORD CADETS RAISE OVER £7000 IN  CHARITY ROW-ATHON

    GUILDFORD CADETS RAISE OVER £7000 IN CHARITY ROW-ATHON

    GUILDFORD CADETS RAISE OVER £7000 IN

    CHARITY ROW-ATHON


    The Guildford Royal Marine Cadets and Sea Cadets beat their previous record by rowing 658 miles in a 24-hour sponsored row-athon at their Guildford unit, TS Queen Charlotte, in Dapdune Wharf earlier this month.  Around 35 cadets took part and together raised £7,260 for The Royal Marines Charity.

    The cadets hit the rowing machines at 08.00 on Saturday 9th November and took turns to row until the same time the following day, after which they got dressed up for the Remembrance Sunday Parade in Guildford High Street. 

    The cadets gained sponsorship from family, friends and supporters to raise funds for a special Royal Marine Club initiative called the annual Family Winter Deployment when Royal Marine veterans take their young families on a special Christmas respite holiday in Norway.

    Says Cadets’ Instructor Ruari Chisholm: “We are delighted to have smashed the distance rowed and fundraising record set last year.  Gaining sponsorship and taking part proved to be a great bonding and team building experience for all the cadets and their families at the Guildford unit, while generating essential funds for a very real cause”.

    The cadets were supported by many local businesses who provided prizes and sustenance, special thanks go to: Seafare Fish & Chips, Burger King, Five Guys, Pizza Gogo and Pizza Hot Express who helped fuel the rowers and Tesco in Bridge Street who provided the bacon sandwiches ingredients for the Remembrance Sunday breakfast.

  7. Ex CANFORD NORWEGIAN VENTURER TIGER 18

    The cross-country ski expedition to Norway, a combined CCF trip between Bradfield College and Canford School cadets, has be...

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    Ex CANFORD NORWEGIAN VENTURER TIGER 18

    Ex CANFORD NORWEGIAN VENTURER TIGER 18

    The cross-country ski expedition to Norway, a combined CCF trip between Bradfield College and Canford School cadets, has been a huge experience for me. I thought I would go on the trip as I generally always wanted to go to Norway and I also really enjoy skiing.  In the weeks leading up to the trip we regularly went out for morning PT at 7 o’clock; an intense 30min workout session especially focusing on the thighs and lower body strength.  During the training days in Norway, leading up to the overnight expedition we would ski for around 5-7 miles, during the expedition we covered 30 miles over 2 ½ days with around 15kg of kit in a rucksack. On the last day it was my groups turn to pull the ‘pulk’, a type of sledge, that you can put kit in and drag behind you. Overall, I enjoyed the trip massively and it gave me a big amount of satisfaction, making me, physically and mentally, a lot stronger.  The highlights were learning to cross country ski, living in a snow shelter and the night in a mountain hut.  I would recommend anyone to do this trip, if you ever get the chance, it was a great experience.

     

    Cadet Sgt Major Antonia Von Stauffenberg, Bradfield College CCF

  8. HMS EXPLOIT Sea Experience Day – West Sussex Units

    HMS EXPLOIT Sea Experience Day – West Sussex Units


    Twelve cadets, aged from 10 - 15 along with three CFAVs from Bognor Regis, Chichester and Lit...

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    HMS EXPLOIT Sea Experience Day – West Sussex Units

    HMS EXPLOIT Sea Experience Day – West Sussex Units

    HMS EXPLOIT Sea Experience Day – West Sussex Units


    Twelve cadets, aged from 10 - 15 along with three CFAVs from Bognor Regis, Chichester and Littlehampton Sea Cadet Units embarked on HMS EXPLOIT based in Portsmouth Naval Base for a sea experience on a cold, wet and windy Tuesday morning in late February. The Commanding Officer, Lt James Silcock RNR, greeted the group on the jetty together with his Executive Officer and gave the safety brief before we all stepped aboard the P200 Patrol Boat to settle down in the Wheel House and on the Flying Bridge as the crew prepared to sail.


    On sailing the cadets saw how the Royal Navy paid respects to other ships as each one was piped based on seniority of their commanding officers as we passed by on our departure from the harbour, with the last being the 1st Sea Lord. As we departed the harbour and headed out into The Solent the swell took affect allowing the cadets and staff to quickly find their sea legs. After a short transit, in poor visibility caused by heavy rain, we found a sheltered area of The Solent to conduct ship maneuvering serials; these were such fun and caused the cadets to pay attention as the ship moved quickly at 20 Knots. Each cadet was given the opportunity to helm or steer the ship whilst following orders from the Captain, altering course, steering hard across the ship’s own wake in a series of tight turns or figure of eights – what fun, and what an experience.


    After some time conducting these serials the weather started to deteriorate, so we headed back to the safety of the harbour, repeating the marks of respect to all ships and the 1st Sea Lord as we sailed up the channel back to 2 Basin. After securing alongside, the crew gave a guided tour of the ship below decks, including the Engine Room and their living quarters giving a great insight into life at sea in the modern Royal Navy.


    All the cadets and staff thoroughly enjoyed the experience and the engagement with the crew asking many questions. Bravo Zulu as we say, or ‘well done’ HMS EXPLOIT.

  9. RETIRED ARMY MAJOR TO TAKE ON GREAT BIRMINGHAM 10K

    RETIRED ARMY MAJOR TO TAKE ON GREAT BIRMINGHAM 10K

     

    Running a 10k may be a challenge for a lot of people, but not for retired Army Major Eamonn Coogan MBE, (58) who is set to take on the Great Birmingham 10k on Sunday 31 May.

     

    ...
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    RETIRED ARMY MAJOR TO TAKE ON GREAT BIRMINGHAM 10K

    RETIRED ARMY MAJOR TO TAKE ON GREAT BIRMINGHAM 10K

    RETIRED ARMY MAJOR TO TAKE ON GREAT BIRMINGHAM 10K

     

    Running a 10k may be a challenge for a lot of people, but not for retired Army Major Eamonn Coogan MBE, (58) who is set to take on the Great Birmingham 10k on Sunday 31 May.

     

    Throughout his thirty-five year career Eamonn, from Smethwick Birmingham, has taken part in several events and made it his mission to raise as much as possible for charity, an endeavour he is continuing with in his current role as Cadet Executive Officer for the Royal County of Berkshire Army Cadet Force.

     

    This time Eamonn will be running for Combat Stress and started his fundraising campaign on his wedding day to Gail in September 2019 by asking guests to donate to the charity rather than buying presents.

     

    For the last 100 years Combat Stress, the leading charity for Veteran’s mental health, has been helping former servicemen and women deal with issues like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression relies solely on donations to provide the services required.

     

    Eamonn says: “When a veteran asks for help Combat Stress develop a programme of treatment and support to meet their individual needs whether that be an hour a week at a peer support group meeting close to home or a six-week residential PTSD treatment programme at a specialist centre.”

     

    Eamonn, from Northfield, first joined the Army Cadet Force in 1974, as a fit and enthusiastic 12-year-old reaching the position of Cadet 4 Star Regimental Sergeant Major of the Warwickshire and West Midlands Army Cadet Force, before joining the regular Army in 1979.

     

    Now in his late fifties, Eamonn’s lifetime of fitness means he’s ready and looking forward to taking on the exciting new course that incorporates the historic heart of Birmingham, its latest developments and world-famous heritage sites.

     

    This year’s Great Birmingham 10K starts in Southside near the much-loved Hippodrome Theatre – a Brummie institution – before going through Digbeth, the Bull Ring and St Martin’s, past Grand Central at New Street station, the Mailbox and – for the first time – the historic Jewellery Quarter.
     

    Serving in numerous ranks and fifteen countries during his career, Eamonn was promoted to Major in 2008 and awarded the MBE in 1999 for leadership, initiative and hard work during his time in the 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment.

     

    Now married to Gail, the couple have six children and five grandchildren between them and Eammon is keen for them to follow in his running footsteps, well aware of the positive impact exercise can have on our mental health.

     

    Eamonn continues: “Today we all know that invisible injuries can be just as hard to cope with as physical ones. This mission of Combat Stress is to help veterans cope with the present; tackle the past and take on the future. My mission is to raise as much as possible to help make this happen.”

  10. South East CCF Air Squadron Trophy

    Sunday 1st December 2019 saw the annual South East area Combined Cadet Force Air Squadron Trophy competition held with the kind per...

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    South East CCF Air Squadron Trophy

    South East CCF Air Squadron Trophy

    Sunday 1st December 2019 saw the annual South East area Combined Cadet Force Air Squadron Trophy competition held with the kind permission of the Station Commander, Royal Air Force Halton.

    The competition included sixteen schools from the South East area and as far away as Dover, Maidstone, Tunbridge Wells and London to name but a few. 6 competition elements were undertaken by some 225 cadets in attendance together with 35 members of school staff and uniformed members all overseen by 16 directing staff.

    The guest of honour, Sir Henry and Lady Aubrey-Fletcher toured the various competition elements speaking with the cadets and staff present.

    Sir Henry presented the various trophy awards for aircraft recognition, command task, drill, first air, RAF knowledge and air rifle shooting.

     

    The overall competition winners being –

    First place – Dulwich College

    Second place – Maidstone Grammar School

    Third placed – The City of London School

     

    After the competition, Squadron Leader Davies said, “We greatly appreciate the time that Sir Henry and Lady Aubrey-Fletcher spent with us especially with their very busy schedule and on the run up to the festive period. It was a great pleasure to have them as our guests for the duration and I know that the staff and cadets really appreciated it”.

  11. Shoreham's Spitfire

    8 December 2019

    Shoreham’s Spitfire

     

    A recent chance discovery has led to some exciting prospects for Shoreham Air Cadets.

    ...

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    Shoreham's Spitfire

    Shoreham's Spitfire

    8 December 2019

    Shoreham’s Spitfire

     

    A recent chance discovery has led to some exciting prospects for Shoreham Air Cadets.

    While researching the aircraft that the Royal Air Force used at Shoreham Airport (Brighton City Airport) during World War 2 the cadets of 1440 (Shoreham-by-Sea) Squadron, Air Training Corps made an exciting discovery about a Supermarine Spitfire on the other side of the world that used to live in Shoreham. This one wasn’t to be found at the Airport, but was instead kept in Eastern Avenue where the Squadron has been based since the 1950s!

    Supermarine Spitfire PK481, a Mark 22 version of the iconic aircraft, entered service with the RAF in September 1945, flying with 611 Squadron until it was retired in 1953 which is where the story gets interesting…

    The aircraft was purchased by the Brighton and Hove Branch of the Royal Air Forces Association (RAFA) who used it as part of their fundraising work, towing it around the local area as part of their Wings Appeal collection each year. Most of the time, however, it was kept at the Territorial Army Centre in Eastern Avenue (where Eastern Close and the Cadet Centre is today), being looked after by members of 1440 Squadron for the next few years.

    The story doesn’t end there, as PK481 didn’t end up on the scrap heap but instead found itself a new home.  It left Shoreham in 1959 for a long sea voyage to Perth, Western Australia! The aircraft was sold by RAFA to the Royal Australian Air Force Association who shipped it across the world to put on display outside their headquarters in Perth.  It remained there until the 1980s where it was fully restored. Today PK481 is the only Mk22 Spitfire in Australia and is proudly on display at the Aviation Heritage Museum in Bull Creek, Western Australia.

    Neil Worth, Civilian Instructor at 1440 Squadron said: “A quick internet search led to some fantastic opportunities for our cadets. We’ve been in touch with the Aviation Heritage Museum in Bull Creek and we are planning all sorts of exciting things together with them and the local Australia Air Force Cadets squadron.”

    Neil added: “Although we’ve been sent some information by the museum, we’d really like to learn more about the history of “our” Spitfire and its time in Shoreham. If anyone has any photographs or information, we’d love for them to get in touch!”  

    If you have any information on the Shoreham’s Spitfire or the history of 1440 Squadron you can contact them through their Facebook page @1440ShorehamSquadron or by e-mailing training.1440@aircadets.org.

  12. 220 Medical Squadron - AT Camp

    In August members from 220 Med Sqn embarked on the annual AT pilgrimage.  This year we planned a trip to Lulworth Cove on the Jurassic Coast to try out coasteerin...

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    220 Medical Squadron - AT Camp

    220 Medical Squadron - AT Camp

    In August members from 220 Med Sqn embarked on the annual AT pilgrimage.  This year we planned a trip to Lulworth Cove on the Jurassic Coast to try out coasteering and abseiling activities.

    Unfortunately, on the day we travelled the country was being bashed with high winds and rain, making it too dangerous to be jumping in and out of the water as much as planned.  So, the following morning I got a text message to meet the instructors at a local landmark called the Dancing Ledge where we ought to be able to carry out some AT activity.  We were still unsure of what activity we would able to do, as even though it was dry, it was very gusty.  When we got down to the ledge the wind had dropped however the swell was impressive.  The instructors told us that the day or two following storms bring the most dangerous sea conditions and so really, we were quite unfortunate with the weather and timing.

    It was decided by the instructors that we could do some rock climbing and abseiling with the shelter from the rock face making it safe enough to try.  3 different routes were setup, and everyone had a go – Cpl Pezzato and Pte Martin doing the females proud and getting back up the hardest route set.  Some enjoyed the challenge and the sea more than others; Cpl Underdown seemed to get the wettest with the waves hurtling up the rocks every time he made his descent.  But then he was in his swimming trunks so was well prepared!

    After the day’s activity we decided we should pay a visit to Lulworth Cove, our intended destination, which was still very busy, and took in the delightful sights of this popular tourist site.