• Supporting Reserve Forces and Cadets in the South East

    Reserves & Cadets
  1. Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust signs Armed Forces Covenant

    Trust signs Armed Forces Covenant

    Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust has signed the Armed Forces Covenant committing to fair tre...

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    Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust signs Armed Forces Covenant

    Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust signs Armed Forces Covenant

    Trust signs Armed Forces Covenant

    Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust has signed the Armed Forces Covenant committing to fair treatment for those who serve, or have served in the military, and their families.

    The Armed Forces Covenant is a promise from the nation to those who serve. It says we will do all we can to ensure they are treated fairly and not disadvantaged in their day-to-day lives. This includes offering injured servicemen and women and bereaved families extra support where appropriate.

    Trust Chief executive, Neil Macdonald, and Head of Royal Air Force Medical Services Air Commodore, Maria Byford, signed the covenant at an event held in the National Spinal Injuries Centre (NSIC), Stoke Mandeville on Wednesday 20 November.

    The Trust also welcomed invited guests and Jonnie the therapy pony from HorseHeard, a charity working with horses to promote positive emotional health and resilience outcomes for children, young people and adults in need. Patients and staff had the opportunity to interact with Jonnie for the afternoon and he made a special visit to see a patient on one of the wards who was unable to come down to the NSIC foyer.

    Neil Macdonald said: “We are proud to sign this Covenant and show our commitment to providing safe and compassionate care to our armed forces. It is especially important to us as a Trust given the number of armed forces bases within the county and of families and local communities connected with them.”

  2. GUILDFORD CADETS RAISE OVER £7000 IN CHARITY ROW-ATHON

    GUILDFORD CADETS RAISE OVER £7000 IN CHARITY ROW-ATHON

    The Guildford Royal Marine Cadets and Sea Cadets beat their previous record b...

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    GUILDFORD CADETS RAISE OVER £7000 IN CHARITY ROW-ATHON

    GUILDFORD CADETS RAISE OVER £7000 IN CHARITY ROW-ATHON

    GUILDFORD CADETS RAISE OVER £7000 IN CHARITY ROW-ATHON

    The Guildford Royal Marine Cadets and Sea Cadets beat their previous record by rowing 658 miles in a 24-hour sponsored row-athon at their Guildford unit, TS Queen Charlotte, in Dapdune Wharf earlier this month.  Around 35 cadets took part and together raised £7,260 for The Royal Marines Charity.

    The cadets hit the rowing machines at 08.00 on Saturday 09 November and took turns to row until the same time the following day, after which they got dressed up for the Remembrance Sunday Parade in Guildford High Street. 

    The cadets gained sponsorship from family, friends and supporters to raise funds for a special Royal Marine Club initiative called the annual Family Winter Deployment when Royal Marine veterans take their young families on a special Christmas respite holiday in Norway.

    Says Cadets’ Instructor Ruari Chisholm: “We are delighted to have smashed the distance rowed and fundraising record set last year.  Gaining sponsorship and taking part proved to be a great bonding and team building experience for all the cadets and their families at the Guildford unit, while generating essential funds for a very real cause”.

    The cadets were supported by many local businesses who provided prizes and sustenance, special thanks go to: Seafare Fish & Chips, Burger King, Five Guys, Pizza Gogo and Pizza Hot Express who helped fuel the rowers and Tesco in Bridge Street who provided the bacon sandwiches ingredients for the Remembrance Sunday breakfast.

  3. OUOTC - Ex Blue Kite

    On 10th August, twelve members of Oxford UOTC set off for an eight day trip to Cyprus. The aim of the exercise was to introduce ten of the twelve to the thrill of kitesurfing, while the remaining two- who had kite surfed on previous occasions- would work on bro...

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    OUOTC - Ex Blue Kite

    OUOTC - Ex Blue Kite

    On 10th August, twelve members of Oxford UOTC set off for an eight day trip to Cyprus. The aim of the exercise was to introduce ten of the twelve to the thrill of kitesurfing, while the remaining two- who had kite surfed on previous occasions- would work on broadening their array of freestyle skills in preparation for the inter services competition.

     

    We could not have possibly have asked for a better location for the exercise. At Lemmings Beach, the sea breeze arrived every afternoon which made kitesurfing possible on each of the eight days, and we were hard pressed to find a cloud in the sky for the duration of the trip. Our accommodation was at Episkopi garrison, a mere five minute drive from our kitesurfing location, and we were incredibly fortunate to be allowed access to the Officers’ Mess just across the road from the garrison.

     

    Each day, we would have breakfast in the mess before heading out to find an area of the island to explore or an activity to do before heading down to Lemmings at around midday in order to get a full afternoon’s kitesurfing. Dave Baker, the head instructor, and his team would split us down into two groups; a “zero to hero” course for the ten beginners and a course focusing on freestyle and upwind riding for the remaining two. Kite sports are highly intricate and require great attention to detail- to avoid accidents more than anything else- but the instructors were consistently impressed with the aptitude of the ten beginners, who proceeded to learn the skills presented to them with haste. They handled the kites with enormous competence and were soon thrust into the water to begin practising with the board, and soon they were riding! Meanwhile, the two more experienced kite surfers in the group, 2Lt Cartwright and OCdt Pitman, were given the opportunity to experiment with a variety of different equipment belonging to the school and to begin to learn and hone new skills under Dave’s advice and direction.

     

    By the end of the week, it was fair to say that all twelve members of the corps had made enormous strides in their kitesurfing ability. Whether it was the ability to ride independently having not touched a kite before or performing jumps of up to seven vertical metres, the exercise was clearly valuable to all.

     

    It is however important to mention that this trip could not have happened without 2Lt Cartwright’s tireless efforts in the lead up to organise it and Dave and his amazing team. We were also enormously grateful for the funding we received and for all the members of staff who served us delicious food and drink throughout at the mess.

  4. Ex. Yeoman’s Observer 19 – 21 Aug 2019

    Ex. Yeoman’s Observer 19 – 21 Aug 2019

     

    75 years after Allied forces landed in Normandy in the largest seaborne invasion in history, personnel from 106 Regiment RA crossed the Channel to see for themselves the formidable defences of Hitler’s Atlantic Wall and the battlefields of Normandy.

     

    The Battlefield study began by visiting Omah...

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    Ex. Yeoman’s Observer 19 – 21 Aug 2019

    Ex. Yeoman’s Observer 19 – 21 Aug 2019

    Ex. Yeoman’s Observer 19 – 21 Aug 2019

     

    75 years after Allied forces landed in Normandy in the largest seaborne invasion in history, personnel from 106 Regiment RA crossed the Channel to see for themselves the formidable defences of Hitler’s Atlantic Wall and the battlefields of Normandy.

     

    The Battlefield study began by visiting Omaha Beach, Dog Green Sector, made famous by the opening scenes of Saving Private Ryan. Whilst the film gives a good indication of the horrors faced by Americans landing there, it gives the impression of a relatively quick, if bloody, battle. The reality is that troops were fighting their way off the beach for hours, not minutes, with some units taking 90% casualties. Standing on the beach you can understand why. High, steep bluffs surmounted by concrete emplacements still exist, and although the main bunker complex is gone, it is possible to stand in trenches and bunkers and look down on the beach. There is no cover, and those on the beach would have been taking fire not only from the bluffs in front but would have been enfiladed from their right flank, all the while taking indirect fire from mortars and German artillery batteries further inland. It sends a shiver down the spine for those on the receiving end.

     

    We then spent some time at the new Overlord Museum before visiting the American Normandy Cemetery and Pointe-du-Hoc. The cemetery shows the human impact of the battle for Normandy in an incredible powerful way with row upon row of identical, perfectly laid out and immaculately kept gravestones. On the other hand, Pointe-du-Hoc is a lunar landscape of immense craters and obliterated bunkers, with enormous lumps of reinforced concrete strewn where the huge naval shells threw them. Both these locations are thought provoking and both are warnings against the horrors of war.

     

    Sunday began with a move to Sainte-Mère-Église, which became the first town in Europe to be liberated during the early hours of 6th June 1944. Here US soldiers of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions held back heavy counter-attacks and secured the western flank of the landings. The Airborne museum here is well worth a visit and really allows you to visualise what paratroopers went through when dropping into France before D-Day.

     

    A whistle-stop visit to Utah Beach followed before we arrived at Maisy Battery, which was recently rediscovered after being lost to history and is now being painstakingly excavated and opened to the public. The site is huge, with 4 gun emplacements, hospital, radar site, command bunker, accommodation bunkers, ammunition magazines, water reservoir and numerous small arms bunkers. We received an informative tour of the battery which lasted well over 2 hours, leaving everyone well and truly ready for dinner and a drink.

     

    Monday morning, after a brief visit to the coastal battery at Longue-sur-Mer, we journeyed to Gold Beach, where the British 50th Division landed and where the notable Mulberry Harbour was constructed. Large elements of the harbour are still visible, particularly at low tide, hinting at how the Allies supplied the hundreds of thousands of men who landed on D-Day before a deep-water port was captured and put to use. It was only fitting that whilst we were at Gold Beach we laid a wreath to honour those who had fallen during Operation Overlord, particularly the Gunners of 50th Division. As an Air Defence Regiment, it was apt that we could pay our respects at a monument that included the 25th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment.

     

    The final stop of the trip was to Pegasus Bridge, which was secured by soldiers of the Ox and Bucks Light Infantry, who were landed by gliders in the early hours of 6th June 1944. The British Airborne Forces were tasked to secure the eastern flank in advance of H-Hour in order to stop German armour from counter-attacking, which they did successfully. Madame Gondrée, who was 5 at the time of landings, still runs the Pegasus Bridge Café by the bridge and provides a warm welcome to veterans and serving personnel alike. It is well worth a visit.

     

    75 years after D-Day there are still plenty of lessons to be learnt by studying what happened; not just in terms of planning and logistics, tactics and strategy, but from the personal accounts of those who took part. It is very easy to lose sight of the individual soldier when looking at history, but it is that individual soldier, then as now, that delivered victory. 

     

    Lt. D. J. Fuller

    457 Bty 106 Regt RA

  5. 151 REGIMENT RLC EXERCISE IRON VIPER 19

    151 Regiment RLC have recently returned following deployment on Exercise IRON VIPER 19, a 101 Logistic Brigade led exercise focussing on the role of a Theatre Logistic Regiment in a Divisional warfighting scenario. The Regiment along with other reserve elements from 157...

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    151 REGIMENT RLC EXERCISE IRON VIPER 19

    151 REGIMENT RLC EXERCISE IRON VIPER 19

    151 Regiment RLC have recently returned following deployment on Exercise IRON VIPER 19, a 101 Logistic Brigade led exercise focussing on the role of a Theatre Logistic Regiment in a Divisional warfighting scenario. The Regiment along with other reserve elements from 157 & 154 Regiments RLC, formed a composite Squadron as part of the Non-Regular Deployable Component (NRDC), supporting 10 The Queens Own Gurkha Logistic Regiment RLC. Reserve elements from 2 OSG and 103 Battalion REME were embedded within it providing additional support. Using a mix of vehicle platforms, the NRDC collected and distributed supplies and materiel from the Midlands down into the South East of England, despite some challenging weather conditions. 

     

    NRDC Troop Commander 2 Lt Dexter Cook (commanding white fleet C+E vehicles explains): “During Exercise IRON VIPER 19, the troops were running road supply moves using a mix of white fleet C+E commercial vehicles and military green fleet. Using different vehicle platforms to resupply and sustain the fighting troops tested our skills by taking us out of our comfort zone. Morale remained high despite some heavy rain, wet ground and boggy conditions”.

     

    The seamlessly integration of Regular and Reserve throughout the exercise demonstrated the strong bonds and shared values that exists within the whole force concept. Highlighting the importance of Regular and Reserve Joint deployments.

     

    NRDC Troop Commander 2Lt James Hancock (commanding green fleet vehicles) explains: “The Troops bonded well together and fully integrated with our Regular colleagues. Working together as one team with one vision, we tested our collective skills, meeting every challenge and task that was presented to us”.

     

    Forward looking and technologically advanced Regular and Reserve units honed their collective skills.  As a Reserve Logistic Regiment, Exercise IRON VIPER provided the opportunity to test our fitness and readiness for warfighting at scale.

     

    OC NRDC Major Paul Herlihy explains: “The exercise provided continuous, purposeful training that tested our leadership and trade skills, in our pursuit of professional excellence, as part of 101 Logistic Brigade (The Iron Vipers). By training hard, we jointly tested the robustness of the supply chain and the combat effectiveness of our soldiers. Ready to serve and deliver future logistic capabilities in support of 3 UK Division (The Iron Division)”.

  6. FIRST ISSUE OF RFCA FUNDED SQN BADGE

    In early 2019, No 501 Sqn were allocated funding by the SE RFCA to purchase their new supply of Sqn ‘tac flashes’, featur...

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    FIRST ISSUE OF RFCA FUNDED SQN BADGE

    FIRST ISSUE OF RFCA FUNDED SQN BADGE

    In early 2019, No 501 Sqn were allocated funding by the SE RFCA to purchase their new supply of Sqn ‘tac flashes’, featuring the famous boars head of 501 Sqn. 

    On Sat 21 Sep 2019, the first of these tac flashes was awarded to AC Amanda Harvey at the RAuxAF Basic Recruit Course Graduation which took place at RAF Halton.  It is a tradition of 501 Sqn that whenever a 501 sqn recruit graduates from Phase 1 recruit training, a member of the Sqn’s command team (usually the Squadron Commander), attended the event. 

    In addition to the Squadron Commander, AC Harvey’s husband Simon, a serving member of 501 Sqn was also in attendance (unknown to Amanda) and he had the honour of awarding her the tac flash.  She will begin her professional training with 501 Sqn as a Logs (Driver) in October. 

    Squadron Leader Andy Marshall, Officer Commanding 501 Squadron commented “ The completion of basic recruit training is an important event for any Serviceman, and for 501 Squadron in particular, it  marks the transition from the semi isolated recruit environment to the fully integrated environment of Squadron life and the beginning of professional training. The award of the Squadron tac flash at this stage is regarded as hugely symbolic and a good tradition for 501 Squadron to maintain ”.  

  7. 151 RLC - Pte Westrip

    Thinking Big,

    When joining the team at 151 Regiment Royal Logistic Corps, r...

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    151 RLC - Pte Westrip

    151 RLC - Pte Westrip

    Thinking Big,

    When joining the team at 151 Regiment Royal Logistic Corps, reservist Gareth Westrip set his sights on driving big trucks.  Gareth started his Reserve career as an infantry soldier but then transferred in order to develop his skills further as a driver.  Starting his driver training, he first passed his theory and driving test enabling him to drive.  Gareth said “obtaining a driving licence not only started my driving career in the Reserves, I was able to transfer the skills into the workplace where I am now employed as a civilian driver”   Developing his skills further,  Gareth has recently passed his LGV Cat C licence and is now starting his RLC driver trade training. During this time he will learn how to maintain vehicles, restrain loads and develop cross country driving skills.  Thinking big, Gareth has his sights set on obtaining his LGV Cat C+E licence, driving large articulated LGV vehicles. 

  8. ERS Silver - 2019 HMS VICTORY

    The 2019 Silver Employer Recognition Awards Ceremony has taken place on the historic ship HMS VICTORY in Portsmouth.

    22 employers from both the public and private sector, were awarded the Silver Award as part of The Defence Employer Recognition Sc...

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    ERS Silver - 2019 HMS VICTORY

    ERS Silver - 2019 HMS VICTORY

    The 2019 Silver Employer Recognition Awards Ceremony has taken place on the historic ship HMS VICTORY in Portsmouth.

    22 employers from both the public and private sector, were awarded the Silver Award as part of The Defence Employer Recognition Scheme (ERS).  Her Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant of Hampshire, Nigel Atkinson, presented the prestigious Silver awards to recognise their continued and invaluable support of the Armed Forces’ Community.  The community includes the Reserves, Service leavers, Armed Forces’ Veterans, the wounded, injured and sick, Cadets, military spouses or partners and their families.

    Charlie Field, Deputy Chairman from C.P.J. Field & Co said:

     “Receiving the Silver ERS Award is wonderful recognition of our companies support of the Armed Forces’ family. A number of our workforce have served in the Forces or are currently serving in the Reserve or Cadet forces; the skills, approach and positivity that they inject into our working day contributes hugely to the overall atmosphere and culture of CPJ Field. It was an honour to receive the award, which highlights not only our ongoing support for our Armed Forces’ but the value the Armed Forces’ community adds in supporting our customers on a daily basis.” 

    The ERS encourages employers to support defence and inspire others to do the same. The scheme encompasses Bronze, Silver and Gold awards for employer organisations that pledge, demonstrate or advocate support to defence and the Armed Forces Community, and align their values with the Armed Forces’ Covenant. 

    Alison Lee, Managing Director from Biscoes Law said: “As a previous Silver Award Employer, and now a Gold Award Employer, I was, as the Managing Director of Biscoes, delighted to be invited back to meet the 2019 Silver Award recipients.  This is a wonderful achievement for all those organisations and businesses receiving their silver award this year and we are keen to encourage them not to rest there but to extend their support to Defence further and try for Gold next year or at some point in the future.”

    The event was supported by the Employer Engagement teams from the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force.  The fantastic Army Medical Service Ensemble welcomed guests to the Historic Dockyard and the evening culminated with the Beating Retreat played by the superb Band of Her Majesty’s Royal Marines Portsmouth.  The Salute was taken by Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant of Hampshire and Rear Admiral Mike Bath, Flag Officer Reserves.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/defence-employer-recognition-scheme

  9. ADULT VOLUNTEER FROM SNODLAND AWARDED COVETED LORD LIEUTENANT’S JUNIOR LEADERSHIP AWARD 2019

    ADULT VOLUNTEER FROM SNODLAND AWARDED COVETED LORD LIEUTENANT’S JUNIOR LEADERSHIP AWARD 2019

    Staff Sergeant Instr...

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    ADULT VOLUNTEER FROM SNODLAND AWARDED COVETED LORD LIEUTENANT’S JUNIOR LEADERSHIP AWARD 2019

    ADULT VOLUNTEER FROM SNODLAND AWARDED COVETED LORD LIEUTENANT’S JUNIOR LEADERSHIP AWARD 2019

    ADULT VOLUNTEER FROM SNODLAND AWARDED COVETED LORD LIEUTENANT’S JUNIOR LEADERSHIP AWARD 2019

    Staff Sergeant Instructor (SSI) Amy-Jane McCann is a Cadet Force Adult Volunteer with the Kent Army Cadet Force (Kent ACF), she was recently awarded the Lord Lieutenant of Kent Junior Leadership Award for 2019. She lives in Snodland and works for Wickes Floor Operations. She is also Detachment Commander for Wrotham and has been with Kent ACF since 2014.

    The Commandant, Kent ACF, Colonel Chris Gilbert, DL  presented the award which is for Junior Adult Officers or Non Commissioned Officers (NCOs), as well as Cadet NCOs, who have demonstrated the most improvement in his or her leadership skills.

    SSI McCann said:

    “After hearing my name being called out on county parade, at first I thought what have I done now, then marching out to realise I was this year's recipient for the Lord Lieutenant’s Junior Leadership award, I felt shocked and truly humbled.

    Being the Detachment Commander at Wrotham is made easy by my staff team and of course my amazing cadets. As for being a part of D company, well they are my family. Having my name on an award with some great previous winners is truly bewildering”.

    Colonel Chris Gilbert, DL, Commandant Kent ACF said:

    “I would like to formally thank SSI McCann for all her hard work running the detachment and being a role model to other staff and cadets – without such dedicated volunteers such as Amy we would not be able to offer the youth of Kent such a wide range of fabulous opportunities that we do today”.

  10. Shoreham Squadron’s Tribute to “The Few”

    Shoreham Squadron’s Tribute to “The Few”

     

    On Sunday 7 July 2019 cadets and staff from 1440 (Shoreham-by-S...

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    Shoreham Squadron’s Tribute to “The Few”

    Shoreham Squadron’s Tribute to “The Few”

    Shoreham Squadron’s Tribute to “The Few”

     

    On Sunday 7 July 2019 cadets and staff from 1440 (Shoreham-by-Sea) Squadron, Air Training Corps were privileged to attend the annual parade and memorial service at the Battle of Britain Memorial in Capel Le Ferne near Folkstone. The Squadron had been invited to represent Sussex at this year’s event, joining over two hundred cadets from across Kent.

    The parade and service are held annually in July, marking the start of the battle that lasted until October 1940. The memorial itself takes the form of a stone pilot that sits on a clifftop overlooking the English Channel, not far from Dover in an area that became known at Hellfire Corner during the war. It commemorates all those who flew and fought in the battle that took place in the skies over Kent and Sussex 79 years ago.

    In the presence of veterans, invited guests and senior representatives of Commonwealth and allied air forces, including Poland, the cadets joined the Central Band of the Royal Air Force, and members of 600 Squadron Royal Auxiliary Air Force parading the Queen’s Colour of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, in being inspected by the current deputy head of the Royal Air Force Air Marshall Andrew Turner CB CBE RAF.

    Speaking to the cadets after the parade Air Marshall Turner told them how extremely proud he was to be associated with such inspiring young people and thanked them for their efforts during the parade. He went on to extol the virtues of service with the Air Cadets and urged the cadets to take full advantage of everything that the organisation has to offer, including flying, gilding and academic qualifications.

    Following the parade the cadets and assembled guests were treated to a flying display by two Spitfires from the RAF’s Battle of Britain Memorial Flight – paying tribute to “The Few” who fought for freedom all those years ago. Cadet Corporal Thomas Worth, 14, from 1440 Squadron said: “It was a real pleasure for us to attend the parade and although it was hard work, it was definitely worth it to be here with the Central Band and the veterans. We’ll definitely be back next year!” 

     

    Follow us on social media for the latest news and information:

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    Facebook:     @1440ShorehamSqn 

  11. Roberts Twins - OUOTC & EUOTC

    OCdts Jennie and Iona Roberts are members of Oxford and Exeter University OTC’s respectively and were delighted to find that they were training together this summer in Gibraltar.  Iona Roberts had volunteered to be enemy for ...

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    Roberts Twins - OUOTC & EUOTC

    Roberts Twins - OUOTC & EUOTC

    OCdts Jennie and Iona Roberts are members of Oxford and Exeter University OTC’s respectively and were delighted to find that they were training together this summer in Gibraltar.  Iona Roberts had volunteered to be enemy for the fighting phase of Oxford UOTC’s camp which was some of the most intensive and challenging training either of the girls had undertaken.  But they loved it!

     

    “Doing an amphibious landing was exciting but fighting through the tunnels with limited sleep was especially tough,” said Jennie, “but we were all in it together and I got a great sense of achievement at the end of it.  I’m so pleased I went!” 

     

    “I really enjoyed attacking my sister and her friends from Oxford UOTC in Gibraltar! We made up on the sports field though,” Iona said with a laugh.

     

    This is not the first time the sisters have competed with each other, they recently represented their UOTC’s in the Queen’s Cup at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.  They are both passionate and dedicated sportswomen, something that began at school in Berkamsted where they both achieved the gold Duke of Edinburgh’s award.  This love of the outdoors and sports meant that joining the UOTC’s has enabled the girls to continue to compete and to learn new skills through university. 

    “I was delighted to come across Oxford UOTC at the Freshers’ Fair at Oxford Brookes then when I went to the Open Evening I knew immediately that this was going to be an important part of my life in Oxford.” said Jennie.  “The values, adventure training, army skills and people combined together for one organisation was something I truly resonated with.”

    OCdt Jennie Roberts has since gained skiing qualifications and has spent the rest of her summer with the UOTC climbing the 2 highest peaks in the UK and gaining mountain leadership skills as she trekked around Mont Blanc.

    To find out more about joining Oxford University Officers’ Training Corps, either as an Officer Cadet or a Regular or Reserve member of the permanent staff, visit http:/bit.ly/OXUOTC

  12. Alcon joins Mission Automotive and signs Armed Forces Covenant

    Alcon joins Mission Automotive and signs Armed Forces Covenant

    Alcon joins Mission Automotive and signs Armed Forces Covenant

    The UK Automotive industry initiative, Mission Automotive, gathers pace as founding member Alcon Components sign the Armed Forces Covenant 

    Internationally acclaimed brake company and Mission Automotive founder partner, Alcon Components Ltd, took the opportunity presented by their presence at Goodwood Festival of Speed to sign the British Armed Forces Covenant on their stand. In doing so, Alcon have undertaken to honour the Armed Forces Covenant and to support the community it represents. It gives formal recognition to the value that serving personnel, both regular and reservists, veterans and military families contribute to society and to the country.

    The Armed Forces representative at the signing, Lieutenant Colonel Chris Coton, Commanding Officer of 16 Regiment Royal Artillery said:  “The Armed Forces Covenant relies on those people, communities, and British businesses to actively support it in making a difference. So, the commitments made today formally enshrine what we know Alcon have already done for many years and are doing every day – to support the employment of service leavers and reservists in your workforce, their spouses and families, the wounded, injured and sick. I thank you whole-heartedly for these commitments.”

    Alistair Fergusson, Group Managing Director at Alcon said: “We’re honoured to have been invited to sign the Armed Forces Covenant today and to take our first steps as part of the Mission Automotive initiative. We’re committed to supporting the Armed Forces communities in any way we can. We recognise the considerable talent on offer as people leave the Armed Forces and the contribution they can make to a business environment such as ours, post-service”. He added: “Aside from our core motorsport business, Alcon has been solving braking problems in the defence and security sectors for over 10 years. We’re now the preferred supplier of bespoke performance braking systems to several major global defence vehicle manufacturers, helping to save lives across the world”.     

     James Cameron, CEO of Mission Motorsport said: “Alcon are an accomplished and innovative company whose products have international impact in motorsport, in automotive and in other areas where their name is less well known – including military applications. They have for many years been staunch supporters of Service causes, looking to make a difference through their work to help those whose lives have been impacted by military service. A leader in their industry, their engagement in the wider Mission Automotive initiative, encouraging others to follow in their footsteps forms powerful advocacy and is to be highly commended.”